Coalition Urges Governor to Stop the Sale of Pet Store Puppies and Urge Food Pantries to Carry Pet Food During Pandemic

A coalition comprised of CVA, HSUS, Our Companions and Bailing Out Benji is asking Governor Lamont to close the loophole in his Executive Order (designating pet shops as essential services) to stop the sale of puppies in pet stores. The letter notes that while pet store sale of food and supplies is an essential services their sale of puppies, kittens and other animals are not and continuing their sale is a risk to both public health and animal health.  At the same time the coalition urged the Governor to use his office to encourage food pantries to be sure to carry pet food because it is a service that helps humans help their companion animals during this economic downturn.  A copy of the letter can be found at this link.  

COALITION LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST - MARCH 10

Come to Hartford and let legislators know that you Speak Up for Animals and want to be heard, talk with others about the bills that will impact animals this session, and stay afterwards to visit with your legislator.  Don't know who that is?  Click here to find your legislator.  

Politics 101: Committees

As part of our ongoing educational series, this month we focus on committees, which play an important and substantial role in the legislative process. There are 26 committees in the CT General Assembly, but the majority of animal-related bills often land in the Environment Committee. Continue reading

Action Alert - Save the Bears and Stop Puppy Mills

  ACTION ALERT We need your help to make sure SB 586, bear hunting, is stopped from moving forward and HB 5386, to stop puppy mills gets voted out of the Environment Committee. The Committee is likely to vote on both bills Monday, March 18, 2019. If you are unsure who your representative is, you can check it with this link.  Please write or call them before Monday with the following message:  Strongly Oppose SB 586 -- Black Bear Hunting in Litchfield County I am a constituent and I strongly oppose this bill in any form.   I understand the bill may be modified to expand existing rules and create a loophole that will give authority to hunt bears in Litchfield County.  Farmer's already have the right to protect their property under DEEP rules and there is no reason to expand the authority.   Please vote no on SB 586. Strongly Support  HB 5386, -- Stop the sale of dogs, cats, and rabbits in CT pet stores   CT's pet stores are a pipeline for hundreds of commercial breeding facilities. Each time someone buys a dog in one of CT’s pet shops, another one is ordered from a commercial facility somewhere in the mid-west to take its place.  CT's pet shop law is broken and can never be fixed.  CT needs to join other states that are moving to stop inhumane and cruel breeding practices.  Our State has over 100 independent and chain pet supply stores that do not sell dogs, cats, or rabbits and thrive on a successful business model based on the ethical principles of adoption and rescue.  I believe CT's nine pet shop businesses can do the same.  Please bring HB 5386 for a vote at the Environment Committee and support its passage.  I'm counting on you to help CT be a leader in the humane treatment of animals.   Thanks for reaching out to your representative.  Remember, your voice counts in Speaking Up for Animals.    

Pet Stores - Connecticut's Pipeline to Misery

How much is that doggie in the window used to convey a sentimental vision of a sweet puppy, lovingly bred and cared for. Reality is quite different. That cute puppy in the window of your local pet store costs anywhere from $1,500 to $2,000 +/–; the higher end usually for cross-breeds like a Chorkie – (Chihuahua/ Yorkie mix) or Maltipoo (Maltese/Poodle mix) or any latest mix that promises never to shed or make you sneeze. The dirty secret that pet stores don’t want you to know is that the puppy was born to a breeding female dog that languishes in what are possibly the cruellest and most inhumane settings you could image. To top it off, the federal government puts its stamp of approval on it saying these places are “USDA Certified,”meeting the standards of care under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). Continue reading

DON'T KILL THE BEARS

CVA joined with Friends of Animals (FOA) and the Humane Society of the United States in urging Governor Lamont to oppose bear hunts in Connecticut.  Our letter points to several crucial facts that people and policy makers should know: According to a recent UConn study there are approximately 400 adult bears in the State; about 235 were identified in the northwest corner. The State has a capacity for 3,000 according to DEEP. Hunting doesn’t solve bear-human conflict issues. Using humane and non-lethal means such as rubber bullets as a deterrent, removing attractants such as bird feeders and unsecured garbage cans all are far more effective. Hunting is not without risk. Hunters in Connecticut killed 10 people and injured 118 in hunting accidents between 1982-2018. There have been no fatal bear attacks in Connecticut and only six in the entire country, mostly in Alaska. Continue reading

CVA 2017/2018 Legislative Scorecard for Animals

Welcome to CVA's first Legislative Scorecard for Animals. CVA’s Scorecard is a record of how CT’s State Legislators voted on bills that CVA identified as priorities or otherwise believed had a significant impact on animals in the state. Election day, November 6, 2018, is swiftly approaching. This is an important election and we encourage everyone to vote. CVA doesn’t endorse candidates but we’re hopeful that CVA’s Legislative Scorecard for Animals will guide its members in their decision-making process. A scorecard is a record of how legislators voted but it doesn’t adequately represent the work that our legislative friends have put into protecting animal welfare interests in the State. Just this year Representative Brenda Kupchick (R-132) and Representative Diana Urban (D-43) were awarded CVA’s first Animal Champion Award for their continuing efforts to create better laws for CT's animals. And when you look at a legislator’s voting record pay attention to who has sponsored CVA's priority bills. While not complete it begins to paint a picture of those who have worked hard to make a difference for animals, and we need more state legislators like them.  Because this is not an all-encompassing picture, CVA encourages members to reach out to the respective candidates running for State Representative and Senator in their district and ask directly about their views on animal welfare in the State, specifically reducing animal cruelty and providing a more humane environment for all animals. To get you started we've put together a few sample questions. Remember, State legislative elections only happen every two years; Vote like the life of CT’s animals depend on it...because it does!  Click on the Image of the Scorecard below to open the document.  

Video Showcases CT Votes for Animals

Get to know CT Votes for Animals! A new video has been created showcasing what CVA does for animals in the state, and how CT residents can join us to support this critical work. Animals across Connecticut need YOUR help and this is a great organization to do that in a very long term, impactful way.  Many thanks to Mark Bellusci at Bellusci Creative for filming, editing, and participating in this beautiful video, and to CVA volunteer Chris Kerin for his partnership throughout this process.

Check Out A New Teaser Video About CVA!

Check out this amazing preview 'teaser' video about CVA produced by our friends at Bellusci Creative! (And be on the lookout for the full version!) We had so much fun making this with the video team and are looking forward to the full version! CVA has some amazing and talented supporters in the community: thank you so much to Mark Bellusci and Chris Kerin!

CT Votes for Animals Statement on Proposed Trophy Ban Reversal

Connecticut Votes for Animals is appalled by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Administration’s proposed roll back of protections for African elephants. Permitting U.S. importation of animal trophies from Zambia and Zimbabwe would only further devastate an already-dwindling population of elephants.  According to the Great Elephant Census, Zambia’s elephant population declined from 200,000 to around 21,000 over the past few decades, and Zimbabwe lost 6% of its elephant population from 2007 to 2014. Zimbabwe’s wildlife management is already infamously poor, and its recent political crisis can only lead to further mismanagement of the species. In light of these facts, it is inconceivable that the U.S. Government would blatantly encourage further devastation of the elephant population through these proposed policies.     Continue reading